The Best Art App for iPhone and iPad

When I was using Sketchbook Pro, which I’ve previously lauded as one of the best art apps for iPad, I’d get lost in my work – I loved the app, it did essentially everything I asked it to. But my exported videos would show when I’d zoomed in or out, which meant there was a lot of blank gray space in my videos. And when I was busy working, when time disappeared and things were going great – ZAP! suddenly the app would shut down and I could lose hours of my work.

So I kept looking for a great art app that would let me use my tablet or iPhone just like a sketchbook and I finally found the One. I use it with a regular tablet pen.

The Procreate Pocket interface, which is the iPhone version. The iPad version has more functionality for the bigger screen. I own both apps.
The Procreate Pocket interface, which is the iPhone version. The iPad version has more functionality for the bigger screen. I own both apps.

Procreate

All the illustrations commissioned by Diamond Montessori were executed on the Procreate App, which means it more than paid for itself - it also paid for the cost of a new device! 
All the illustrations commissioned by Diamond Montessori were executed on the Procreate App, which means it more than paid for itself – it also paid for the cost of a new device!

My favorite app – the one that I use a lot, that I’m using to create my tarot cards, that I use to create all my digital illustrations – is now exclusively Procreate. Even when Procreate suddenly shuts down, all my work is automatically saved. And every stroke I make is recorded so I can export my whole drawing process as a video when I’m done- here’s a truncated version from the Temperance tarot card I posted to Instagram:

More small changes #tarot #temperance #art #process #procreate

A video posted by Katana Leigh (@katanaleigh) on

Hibiscus Flower Pen and Ink Drawings

 

In keeping with my Hibiscus Watercolor paintings and Hibiscus Pastel Drawings, here are black and white line drawings of the same hibiscus.

Hibiscus Watercolor Flower Studies

Look at these two Hibiscus flowers – one done in oil pastel, the other in watercolor: image

Today I did still life studies of Hibiscus Flower  again, like yesterday. Painting Hibiscus Flower in watercolor makes a big difference between today’s flowers and yesterday’s oil pastel flowers. The marks and shapes change with the medium and give the flowers a different flavour.

Hibiscus Flower studies in watercolor.

Painting something many times is like memorizing a song; you start to know how the light falls and can paint it later, from memory.

Pastel Hibiscus and Art Process

These hibiscus flower drawings were done over three hours with oil pastels. Creativity needs space. Demanding good results is a pressure that squashes creativity. I didn’t set a time limit, I just decided to draw. 

These Hibiscus flowers are all sketches I did today over the course of about three hours. I think they will look gorgeous hung together on a wall with identical frames in a grid.

The best thing to do is sit down with some paper, something to draw with (paint, pastels, crayons, pens, stamps, anything), and something to listen to so that you don’t notice the passing of time. That’s how I get into the zone. I also love Alan Beck’s creativity experiment: lighting a bit of white sage before painting.

Pencil Drawings This Week

Pencil drawings from my artist’s sketchbook. I hope you enjoy them. I used references from art history books for the mermaid (an old circus poster), Diana (a classical painting), and the sitting woman (a sketch by artist Whistler).

Artist Sketchbook Stairways and Dreams

A little series of sharpie marker drawings from my sketchbooks of dreamlike stairs that aren’t quite architecturally sound, like they could give way at any moment. They go up and down and sometimes don’t lead anywhere at all.  I have recurring dreams of buildings filled with stairways, improbable layouts, and secret passageways.