How To Make Blueberry Bannock

Bannock is a native american, in my case CREE, scone type bread.

Egg Free Bread with Blueberries bannock recipe.

My Mom’s Bannock Recipe

Bannock is a bread that my mom makes. I am under the impression it was the quick bread best suited to the ingredients the government gave out. It’s like scones, and it has no egg (which I am allergic to). So if you are allergic to eggs, you’ll enjoy this too. Most Cree / Native / First Nations / Native American / Indigenous people have had this at one time or another. It also goes by the name ‘fry bread’ and sometimes is made in a frying pan. This is the one I grew up with.

Here is a photo of my mom's bannock cooling on a rack in my kitchen. You can see Morro Rock in the distance.
Here is a photo of my mom’s bannock cooling on a rack in my kitchen. You can see Morro Rock in the distance. This one is a little flat because of the shortening we used. Butter and Tenderflake will make your bannock fluffier.

My mom makes this every week and brings it to the food kitchen. They call her Bannock lady. She made it for after school snacks, and some of my friends (comment if this is you, it makes me happy) still remember eating it at our house when we lived in the same town.

It took me so long to learn how to make it. When my husband and I were visiting at Christmas two and a half years ago, she made it every morning, so this last visit I made sure to learn how to make it too, so that we could have it when we missed home. And because Jeremy kept raving about how he wanted to eat it more often.

My mom mixing blueberries with flour and sugar before adding them to the bannock.
My mom mixing blueberries with flour and sugar before adding them to the bannock.

Why are Blueberries in this Recipe?

Blueberries, small and dusty blue with kiwi-green centers, grow wild in northern Saskatchewan, where my Cree family lives, especially around Lac La Ronge. So they are a food that is totally abundant – on the reserve industrious people fill up their freezers. A blueberry bannock can also be smothered in blueberry jam (which is more like syrup filled with whole blueberries.) You can’t buy any blueberry this delicious anywhere else in the world. Maybe New Brunswick has good blueberries too, but northern Saskatchewan is still amazing. For 10 grand I suppose I could show you these wild blueberries. Otherwise you are best served by going to the farmer’s market or what have you in your area.

I should have gotten to the camera before we started eating this bannock.
I should have gotten to the camera before we started eating this bannock.

What can You Add to Bannock?

Pretty much anything. When I was little I liked chocolate chips, but not so much anymore. Jeremy has put in a vote for chocolate-covered açai berries; I vetoed it. Raisins, cranberries, dulce de leche … this could all work. Whatever is local and in season or in your kitchen. If it’s a berry, add flour so that your dough doesn’t get too soggy.

OK, Here is the Bannock Recipe

Here are all the ingredients you need to make bannock : flour, lard, salt, baking powder.
Here are all the ingredients you need to make bannock : flour, lard, salt, baking powder. Blueberries are optional.
Start with 4 cups of flour in a large mixing bowl.
Start with 4 cups of flour in a large mixing bowl.
Add a pinch of salt. Like a teaspoon.
Add a pinch of salt. Like a teaspoon.
Two tablespoons of baking powder. Or a bit more.
Two tablespoons of baking powder. Or a bit more.
Mix all the dry ingredients together.
Mix all the dry ingredients together and then add in the shortening.
Cut in 1/2 a cup of shortening. I like butter because it stays softer longer. My mom says use tenderflake lard.
Cut in 1 1/2 to 2 cups of shortening. I like butter because it stays softer longer. My mom says use tenderflake lard.
Two cups of water to make it a dough.
Two cups of water to make it a dough.
Pour those two cups of water into the center of the flour and mix the flour in from the sides. Think of erosion.
Pour those two cups of water into the center of the flour and mix the flour in from the sides. Think of erosion.
Your finished bannock dough. Now its time to add blueberries or some other delicious thing. Or not.
Your finished bannock dough. Now its time to add blueberries or some other delicious thing. Or not.
Roll your bannock out on a floured surface. I cheat by flouring the pan I use to cook the bannock.
Roll your bannock out on a floured surface. I cheat by flouring the pan I use to cook the bannock.
Mix a 1/4 of flour and 1/4 cup of sugar with 1 cup of blueberries. The flour keeps the blueberries from making the bannock soggy.
Mix a 1/4 of flour and 1/4 cup of sugar with 1 cup of blueberries. The flour keeps the blueberries from making the bannock soggy.
Put all your blueberrys into the bannock dough.
Put all your blueberries into the bannock dough.
Fold/Roll up the bannock so the blueberries are in the middle.
Fold/Roll up the bannock so the blueberries are in the middle.
Bake for about 45 minutes at around 400.
Bake for about 45 minutes at around 400.
Home made blueberry Bannock.
Home made blueberry Bannock.

 

tl;dr Here is the recipe all in one image.

How to make your own blueberry bannock.
How to make your own blueberry bannock. (Native American Scones)

Author: Katana

Katana Leigh is a professional international artist with her paintings at home in Canada, the USA, Costa Rica, Australia, and more. Find her on Artist Katana Shop, Google! and Instagram

3 thoughts on “How To Make Blueberry Bannock”

  1. This is awesome camping food too. It cooks beautifully in a Dutch oven buried in the coals, on a hot rock with reflectors set up, or even wrapped around a stick in single portions hot dog style.

    Thank you for sharing your family recipie. I’ve seen other versions using cornmeal, oatmeal etc- it seems to be, as you said, made with whatever people had.

  2. I am so glad you posted this! Your mom’s kitchen was my first introduction to bannock, and it always makes me think of you. 🙂

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